Resolution number: 03

Title: Child Abuse

Submitted by: INLW (International Network of Liberal Women)

The Congress of Liberal International, convened in Andorra, on 20 May 2017

Noting that:

World Health Organization (WHO), distinguishes four types of child maltreatment: physical abuse; sexual abuse; neglect and negligent treatment; emotional abuse; and exploitation

Child abuse can result in immediate adverse physical effects but it is also strongly associated with developmental problems and with many chronic physical and psychological effects, including

subsequent ill-health, including higher rates of chronic conditions, high-risk health behaviours and shortened lifespan.

The Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC), of which Article 19 calls on all political parties to take all appropriate legislative, administrative, social and educational measures to protect the child from all forms of physical or mental violence, injury or abuse, neglect or negligent treatment, maltreatment or exploitation, including sexual abuse, while in the care of parent(s), legal guardian(s) or any other person who has the care of the child.

Child maltreatment is a global problem with serious life-long consequences

Despite recent national surveys in several low- and middle-income countries, data from many countries are still lacking

Considering it:

Worldwide because Child abuse occurs irrespective of gender, social standing, ethnicity, or religion. International child abuse statistics are difficult to come by due to the difficulty in keeping track of numbers and the hidden nature of some forms of abuse even in “financially sound” countries. Even though many countries keep no or inadequate records, politics are not doing enough. This is why we must raise awareness of the negative impact that violence and abuse have on women and children and rid society of abuse permanently.

Worldwide… because violence against children takes many forms, including physical, sexual, and emotional abuse, and may involve neglect or deprivation. Violence occurs in many settings, including the home, school, community and over the Internet.

Worldwide…because thousands or refugee children are being abused exploited and arbitrarily detained.

Worldwide…because in many countries children are used as target for emotional abuse and of neglect. Is known that child abuse happens constantly in war zones, in schools and in child marketing.

Worldwide…because child abuse happens in advertising, the food and beverage industry is marketing our children and youth to sickness or even death

The nature of international communication means that abuse occurs across international borders.

Calls on upon member parties and other liberal organizations to urge their governments around the world to bring this issue to attention: Raise the alert and protect our future generations from ritual and sexual abuse.

Pay special attention to and raise the awareness of child abuse in war zones.

Draw attention to child abuse in schools.

Let political parties intervene and put an end to inappropriate marketing to children

Draw attention to children used as targets such as in Europe, Syria, Iraq, Africa and other countries.

Non-profit agencies should work together in seeking funding that supports preventive effort.

Partner with national experts who can collect data to build the evidence base. Make use of data to demonstrate the need for increased funding for prevention programs.

Political parties to focus on the issue “child abuse” and keep it on the political agenda. WHO’s and International Society for Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect (ISPCAN) Campaign on preventing child maltreatment.

 

Joaquima Alemany Roca has presented her book “Women and Liberalism” during the 20th anniversary of INLW, which was celebrated on the18th of May 2017 in Andorra.

Joaquima is Past President of INLW, but was involved as a lawyer and mediator, councilor of the Barcelona City Council, Member of the Spanish and the Catalan Parliament and many other organizations concerning women’s freedom and democracy. She has written several works on Women’s rights and has participated in relevant international conferences. She was one of the group of lawyers who participated in the drafting of the Penal Code Law.

In her new book “Women and Liberalism” she describes and identifies the liberal values and principles that were born in Britain. This book enlightens us about the struggle for women’s equality going back for centuries.

Historical or Classical Liberalism has helped to prepare the ideological foundations of Western Democracies of today. The Liberal values and principles have led to new ways of doing politics, away from the totalitarian and dictatorial processes.

Juli Minoves/ Margaret de Vos/ Joaquima Alemany

President LI/ President INLW

We congratulate Joaquima on the presentation of her book.

Andorra, 17 May 2017

INLW Board held a meeting with the members that were present for the 70th Congress of LIberal International. Mireia Huerta, Secretary, Silvia Flury member of INLW, Margaret de Vos van Steenwijk, President, Khadija El Morabit, vice-president Mena region, Joaquima Alemany, past president, Maysing Yang, vice-president Asia, Lysbeth van Valkenburg, Treasurer and Ruth Richardson, who was going to be appointed as a member of the Board the next day during the General Meeting.

During the board meeting the New Manifesto and our resolutions were discussed.

Annemie Neyts-Uyttebroeck, Patron of INLW

Maysing Yang, vice-president Asia

During our General Meeting, many members were present by the presentation of the book about Women and Liberalism of our past president Joaquima Alemany Roca.

Khadija El/ Ruth / Maysing / Lysbeth / Juli / Margaret / Hakima El / Annemie/ Joaquima/ Mireia Morabit/ Richardson /Yang/ v.Valkenburg/ Minoves/dVos vSteenwijk/Haité/Neyts/Alemany/Huerta Sala

Hans van Baalen,                     Juli Minoves,                           Hakima El Haité,

Past President LI                   President LI                             Deputy President LI

INLW is very proud to announce that on Saturday 20th of May 2017 in Andorra, INLW Deputy President Hakima El Haité was appointed as the Deputy President of LI, during the LI 70th Congress!

INLW Congratulates Halima with her prestigious appointment in the LI Bureau. As a consequence of this appointment Hakima has given up her seat on the INLW Board, which we fully understand.

Hakima has devoted a great deal of energy and time to the empowerment of women. She is the founder and first President of the ConnectinGroup in Morocco which is an association of Liberal minded business and professional women, who are stimulated to become active in politics and public affairs and to fight for women’s political rights.

Due to her involvement and passion for women’s rights and women’s participation and her years long membership of our Board, the INLW Board has decided to appoint Hakima as Patron of INLW.

She has gladly accepted this position!

18th May 2017 at Hotel Golden Tulip Fenix, Prat Gran 3-5, Andorra at 10.30 a

“20 YEARS INLW” And how is women’s empowerment in Andorra being achieved?

10.30 Opening of INLW panel event

Margaret de Vos van Steenwijk: Presentation 20 Years INLW

Carine Montaner, Andorra MP; Economic Empowerment of Women in Andorra,

Joaquima Alemany, Past President; Presentation of book

Maysing Yang, Vice President Asia; situation in Asia,

Panel Discussion

Followed by discussion with the speakers and among others Khadija El Morabit, Vice President MENA

On the 25th of March the Dutch Liberal Women’s Network organised a speed-dating event to inspire women to apply for the municipal elections in March 2018. Over 35 women and one gentleman, some members of VVD and some just interested persons made the acquaintance of several VVD politicians. The municipal elections next year in March may seem a long way off but in the second half of this year the candidate lists will be made. Dutch Liberal Women’s Network states that the number of women in city councils are still insufficient compared to the number of men, according to Karima Bouchtaoui, member of the Liberal Women’s Network.

In 2014 only 28,3 % of the members were women and only 20% of the alderman were female. The number of mayors is slowly increasing but especially in small villages the number of women is still low. Time for action!

The event started with a lunch in order to network with one another. During the speed date the ladies had talks with Chantal Nijkerken, Hayke Veltman, Eric Ziengs, Paulien Geerdink and Sabine Koebrugge all politicians in parliament or local councils.

Questions such as: How can you become active in the local politics? What are the do’s and don’ts if you want to become a member of the city council? How is the procedure to get on the candidate list? were discussed. The experiences and personal stories that the VVD politicians gave, were helpful and motivating. The entire event was an enormous success. Cards were exchanged and conversations profound. But the most important result was that after the event several ladies decided to get themselves candidate for the procedure to be elected as a member of the city council. That was the purpose of this speed dating, according to Liberal Women’s Network chair Marijke Vos-Maan in her final words.

On to March 21st, 2018 with a good many talented women on the list!

H.E. (Lysbeth) van Valkenburg-Lely

President Dutch Chapter INLW

Hereby we are sending you all the documents for our INLW General Meeting to be held in Andorra on May 18th  2017 at 9 am in Hotel Roc Blanc.

If you are considering coming to Andorra to participate at our General Meeting as well as at the Liberal International 70th  Anniversary Congress you should inscribe for the Congress before 4 may it says on the inscription site! If you would like to participate as a delegate of INLW please let me know as soon as possible as there is a limit to the amount of delegates allowed per LI member (INLW can have 10 delegates).

For more information on the Congress please look at the LI website, www.liberal-international.org.

 

As far as our General Meeting is concerned:

Ruth Richardson from the Netherlands Antilles Aruba, who lives and works in the Netherlands for the Waterboard Rijnland has expressed her interest and willingness to become member of the INLW Board as Member with the specific task of stimulating the Discussion within INLW and Following the UN agenda for INLW Board and members.  At the moment we are concentrating on the UN Commission on Women and to a certain degree on the Human Rights Commission in Geneva. But there are other subjects to study and follow at the UN. For instance on the subject of Environment and Sustainability and the SDG’s which are subjects that influence the lives of women and girls enormously. She is also willing to participate at some of the Conferences as a delegate for INLW. So I am very pleased to welcome Ruth in our Board to strengthen our work. She already helped this time by suggesting the two INLW resolutions and making the basic resolutions.

 

Patricia Olamendi and Leticia Gutíerrez both from Mexico, whose CV’s and photos are to be found  in the attachments were co opted (asked to join the Board) at the last Liberal International Congress just after we held our INLW General Meeting. We only met each other then, which was too late to nominate them to be appointed in Mexico. Since they have joined, Patricia as Vice President for Latin America and Leticia as Member for expecially Mexico, have been actively participating in INLW. They were both in Barcelona when we held a Board Meeting to start up the new 3 year period of the Board and they were both at CSW last year and this year Leticia was also at CSW. Leticia and Patricia have been active with the “Consensus of Mexico”, a written Statement on the status of women’s rights and what is needed, which they made. They have collected thousands of signatures on the document from women in the area. At our General Meeting they will be officially appointed as members of the INLW Board.

These are the expected mutations to the Board.

 

Members can nominate a person for the other vacancies on the Board: Deputy Assistant, Vice General Secretary, Vice Treasurer, which have been vacant for some time. At the moment we think we have enough Board Members, but if an occasion occurs that we find someone from a country or an area which is not so well represented within INLW, that might be a good occasion to fill a vacancy. If a member wants to nominate someone; then please send us the name, a short Bio. with a recent photo and a recommendation from the party or organization as well as a motivation by the person before May 7th.

 

After our General Meeting which will be held from 9-10.15am, we will be holding an OPEN EVENT for all interested people from 10.30 till 12 o’clock. We hope to welcome some local Liberal Women from Andorra at this event.

 

 

INLW Morning Discussion

18th May 2017 at Hotel Roc Blanc, Andorra at 10.30 am

“20 YEARS INLW”

 

 

10.30     Opening of INLW panel event

  • Presentation 20 Years INLW
  • By amongst others Joaquima Alemany, Maysing Yang, Khadija El Morabit and myself

We are looking forward to seeing some of you in Andorra !

If you have questions please don’t hesitate to ask us.

 

With best wishes,

 

Margaret de Vos van Steenwijk                                Mireia Huerta

President of INLW                                                       Secretarry General of INLW

2017 Resolutions LI Andorra01 The Global Improvement of Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (Open VLD) (1) 2017 Resolutions LI Andorra01 The Global Improvement of Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (Open VLD) 2017 AGENDA General Meeting Andorra 2017 financial report 2015-2016 Andorra (2)

This gallery contains 27 photos.

13-24 March 2017

INLW was represented at the CSW by Khadija El Morabit (Vice Presidentfor MENA region), Lysbeth van Valkenburg (Treasurer) Margaret de Vos van Steenwijk (President), and Leticia Gutíerrez (Member of the Board), also Petra Rona member of INLW. Joaquima Alemany (Past President) also participated representing Dones et Libertat of which she is the President.

“Women’s Economic empowerment in the Changing World of Work” was this year’s priority theme. If we are to achieve gender equality by 2030, we must realize that this is everyone’s responsibility to ensure that it happens. The priority theme highlights, the vulnerability of women and girls as the most likely to be left behind economically and in status in the workplace. Women and girls must be ensured of equal access to technology; to land ownership; to finance/microfinance; the opportunity for higher and continuing education and they must be prepared and supported to hold positions of leadership in both public and private sectors and to have their rightful seat at the table during organizational, labor and peace negotiations.

On Monday morning in the General Assembly we were welcomed by the new Secretary General of the UN, Antonio Guterres. He showed his heart lies with achieving the empowerment of women! “Male chauvinism blocks women. That hurts everyone. The empowerment of women is our key priority!”

The Executive Director of UN Women Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka spoke of the “Constructive impatience for change”. “This CSW could be the much-needed accelerator for the implementation 2 and achievement of the 2030 agenda. We must make, and can make, the world of work, work better for women, transforming economies and realizing rights. We only have thirteen years until 2030. Every week and every month counts.”

During the first week, a 3-minute action was held at the UN symbolic of the time that women and men’s pay is no longer equal. At the UN and at local/national levels we must create new arenas of decent work for women and girls, where there are no pay gaps, where labor laws are rightsbased and informal, unpaid care and domestic work is fully recognized.

Because of the winter storm the congress was closed throughout the Tuesday.

INLW board members who were present in New York used this time to hold a meeting to discuss the congress and to prepare INLW 20th anniversary this year in Andorra.

The first day one of the events where we were present was: “Gender equality the Nordic way: What can we learn from it”.
We have already heard about this method which is called the “Barber Shop”. It is all about the importance of mobilizing men and boys for gender equality. The Barber Shop, a place where many men meet can bring a conversation about how to treat women and how to communicate with women amongst men where they can talk among themselves in safe surroundings. This is led by 1 or 2 men who are bringing in the dialogue and reflection on how to make a better understanding between men and women and in the end more solidarity on issues such as equal pay. Investing in a good relationship between the sexes builds a better company in the end. In Switzerland, there is already a complete legal framework to see to equal pay and development. This is also shown in yearly surveys how companies are faring: “Naming and shaming”. It has been proved that by having more women in the top a business gets 37% more results.

In Iceland, the government will get a law through parliament this year to get equal pay in 2020!

Every morning at 8.30 we were present at the NGO morning briefings.

This year fortunately at the end all participating countries signed the “Agreed Conclusions”.

Press release from CSW

Feminist persistence pays off at UN Commission Status of Women, but challenges loom large in the changing world of work

Feminist activists have seen their hard work pay off as the UN 61st Commission on the Status of Women adopted a set of Agreed Conclusions that made significant commitments to advance women’s rights and economic empowerment in the changing world of work.

In response to feminists’ demands for gender-just strategies to confront the multiple impacts of climate change and related ecological damage, the Commission recognized the imperative of moving towards a just transition of the workforce toward low-carbon economies that deliver for women and the planet. “Now is the time for the strongest possible action toward a climate just planet, and this requires actions like a global moratorium on coal and keeping global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius, said Noelene Nabulivou of Diverse Voices and Action for Equality, Fiji. “This must be carried forward through a gender just and equitable and safe transition toward a low-carbon economy.”

The Commission also called for gender-responsive strategies to increase women’s resilience to the economic impacts of climate change. Recognizing that women continue to shoulder the bulk of unpaid care and domestic work, the Commission established a blueprint for governments to reduce and redistribute this work through public services, labour and social protections, and affordable child and other care services. The Commission also urged governments to measure the value of unpaid care and domestic work through time use surveys, which will help measure progress towards the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

For the first time, the Commission recognized the importance of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, as it examined the focus area of indigenous women’s empowerment. The Commission also called upon governments to respect and protect indigenous women’s traditional and ancestral knowledge, and address the multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination and violence that they face. “That the Commission on the Status of Women also called for support for Indigenous women’s financial independence and economic self-determination, for example by establishing Indigenous-owned businesses, is a hard-won but important step for Indigenous sisters around the world,” said Sarah Burr, of the YWCA Australia.

In other wins, the Commission urged governments to end violence and harassment against women in the world of work, with a specific focus on strengthening and enforcing laws and policies and developing measures to promote the re-entry of victims and survivors of violence into the labour market. It also recognized that sexual and reproductive health and rights is essential for women’s economic rights, independence and empowerment. “These were hard-fought gains as countries like the United States, Russia and Guyana worked to weaken governments’ resolve to tackle violence and harassment and protect sexual and reproductive rights,” said Shannon Kowalski of the International Women’s Health Coalition. “Governments must face the facts that women’s rights to exercise autonomy over their bodies and lives is critical to their economic empowerment.” Language on families was also constructive in that it implied the reality of a diverse range of family structures. 5 The Women’s Rights Caucus is a coalition of more than 250 feminist and women’s rights organizations from across the globe.

For more information about CSW61 go to www.UNWomen.org. There you can also find in the official documents our INLW written statement: E/CN.6/2017/NGO/86. And on our website in the chapter CSW, www.inlw.org . The agreed Conclusions when definite will also appear on both websites.

Lysbeth van Valkenburg-Lely

Margaret de Vos van Steenwijk-Groeneveld